Tag Archives: Parkersburg West Virginia

Electrical Conductor Types

Common Electrical Conductor Types

Poorly installed and maintained electrical cables are a common cause of  electrical fires in homes. Many older homes contain wiring that is now  considered obsolete or dangerous. InterNACHI inspectors should understand the  basic distinctions between the different types of cable systems so that they can  identify unsafe conditions.
Romex Cables
Romex is the trade name for a type of electrical conductor with  non-metallic sheathing that is commonly used as residential branch wiring. The  following are a few basic facts about Romex wiring:
  • Romex is a common type of residential  wiring that is categorized by the National Electrical Code (NEC) as  underground feeder (UF) or non-metallic sheathed cable (NM and  NMC).
  • NM and NMC conductors are composed of two or more insulated conductors  contained in a non-metallic sheath. The coating on NMC cable is non-conducting,  flame-resistant and moisture-resistant. Unlike other cables commonly found in  homes, they are permitted in damp environments, such as basements.
  • Underground feeder conductors appear similar to NM and NMC cables except  that UF cables contain a solid plastic core and cannot be “rolled” between  fingers.

 

 
The following NEC regulations apply to Romex  conductors:
  • They are not permitted in residential construction higher than three  stories, or in any commercial construction.
  • They must be protected, secured and clamped to device boxes, junction boxes  and fixtures.
  • Support devices that may damage the cables, such as bent nails and  overdriven staples, are not permitted.
  • NM and NMC cables should be secured at intervals that do not exceed 4½ feet,  and they should be secured within 12 inches of junction boxes and panels to  which they are attached. Cables that do not comply with this rule can sag and  are vulnerable to damage.
  • They are intended as permanent wiring in homes and should not be used as  a substitute for appliance wiring or extension cords.

Note:  Some communities have never allowed the use of  Romex wiring in residential construction. Armored cable is typically used in  these communities.

Armored Cables (AC)
Armored cable (AC), also known as BX, was developed in the early 1900s by  Edwin Greenfield. It was first called “BX” to abbreviate “product B –  Experimental,” although AC is far more commonly used today. Like Romex cables,  they cannot be used in residences higher than three stories, and the rules for  protection and support of AC wiring are essentially the same as the rules for  Romex. Unlike Romex, however, AC wiring has a flexible metallic sheathing that  allows for extra protection. Some major manufacturers of armored cable are  General Cable, AFC Cable Systems, and United Copper Systems.
Service Entry (SE) Conductors
These cables begin at the splice and enter the meter. They are not  permitted inside homes, with the exception of “style R” SE cable that can serve  as interior wiring in branch circuits for ovens and clothes dryers. Style R  cables should be clearly marked on their jacket surfaces.
Knob-and-Tube (KT) Wiring
Most houses constructed prior to World War II were wired using the  knob-and-tube method, a system that is now obsolete. They are more difficult to  improve than modern wiring systems and are a fire hazard. Knob-and-tube wiring  is supported with ceramic knobs, and runs intermittently though ceramic  tubes beneath framing and at locations where the wires intersect. Whenever an  inspector encounters knob-and-tube wiring, s/he should identify  it as a defect and recommend that a qualified electrician evaluate the  system. The following are a few reasons why inspectors should be wary of this  old wiring system:
  • The dissipated heat from knob-and-tube wiring can pose a fire hazard if the  wires are enveloped in building insulation. A possible exception is fiberglass  insulation, which is fire-resistant, although even this type of insulation  should not cover knob-and-tube wiring. The homeowner or an electrician should  carefully remove any insulation that is found surrounding KT wires.
  • Knob-and-tube wiring is more vulnerable to damage than modern wiring because  it is insulated with fiber materials and varnish, which can become brittle.
  • Some insurance companies refuse to write fire insurance for houses with this  type of wiring, although this may be remedied if an electrician can verify that  the system is safe.
  • Disregarding any inherent inadequacies, existing KT cable systems are likely  to be unsafe because they are almost guaranteed to be at least 50 years  old.
In summary, inspectors should understand the different types of conductors  that are commonly found in homes.
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Building a Home New Construction Phase Inspection

Building a Home

 

 

If you want to build a  new home, there are things you need to know before you begin. Learn about  construction standards and about buying land, so you know your rights. 

 MPS Supplementing Model Building  Codes
  The Minimum  Property Standards (MPS) establish certain minimum standards for buildings  constructed under HUD housing programs. This includes new single-family homes,  multi-family housing and healthcare-type facilities.
 
HUD Minimum Property Standards  and How They Supplement the Model Building Codes
Until the mid-1980s, HUD maintained  separate Minimum Property Standards for different types of structures. Since  that time, HUD has accepted the model building codes, including over 250  referenced standards and local building codes, in lieu of separate and  prescriptive HUD standards. However, there is one major area of difference  between the MPS and other model building codes — durability requirements. Homes  and projects financed by FHA-insured mortgages are the collateral for these  loans, and their lack of durability can increase the FHA’s financial risk in the  event of default. More specifically, the model codes do not contain any minimum  requirements for the durability of items such as doors, windows, gutters and  downspouts, painting and wall coverings, kitchen cabinets and carpeting. The MPS  includes minimum standards for these, and other items, to ensure that the value  of an FHA-insured home is not reduced by the deterioration of these components. 
 
HUD Field Office Acceptance for  Areas Without Building Codes
  HUD requires  that each property insured with an FHA mortgage meet one of the nationally  recognized building codes or a state or local building code based on a  nationally recognized building code. In areas where such state or local codes  are used, HUD determines if the state or local code is comparable to the model  building code. There are also areas of the United States that do not have  building codes. If no state or local building code has been adopted, the  appropriate HUD Field Office will specify a building code that is comparable to  one of the nationally recognized model building codes.
Interstate Land Sales
  The  Interstate Land Sales program protects consumers from fraud and abuse in the  sale or lease of land. In 1968, Congress enacted the Interstate Land Sales Full  Disclosure Act, which is patterned after the Securities Law of 1933, and  requires land developers to register subdivisions of 100 or more non-exempt lots  with HUD, and to provide each purchaser with a disclosure document called a  property report. The property report contains relevant information about the  subdivision and must be delivered to each purchaser before the signing of the  contract or agreement.
 
Buying Lots from  Developers
Be well informed when shopping for land. Lots may be  marketed as sites for future retirement homes, for second home locations, or for  recreational or campsite use. However, be wary of any investment aspect that may  be stressed by sales personnel. If you plan to purchase a lot which is offered  by promotional land sales, take plenty of time before coming to a decision.  Before signing a purchase agreement, a contract, or a check:
 
  • know your rights as a buyer;
  • know something about the developer;
  • know the facts about the development and the lot you plan to  buy; and
  • know what you are doing when you encounter high-pressure  sales campaigns.
Generally, if the company from which you plan to buy is  offering 100 or more unimproved lots for sale or lease  through the mail or by means of interstate commerce, it may be required to  register with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). This  means that the company must file with HUD and provide prospective buyers with a  property report containing detailed information about the property. Failure to  do this may be a violation of federal law, punishable by up to five years  in prison, a $10,000 fine, or both. The information filed by the developer and  retained by HUD must contain such items as these:
  • a copy of the corporate charter and  financial statement;
  • information about the land, including title  policy or attorney’s title opinion, and copies of the deed and  mortgages; 
  • information on local ordinances, health  regulations, etc.; 
  • information about facilities available in the  area, such as schools, hospitals and transportation systems; 
  • information about availability of utilities and  water, and plans for sewage disposal; 
  • development plans for the property, including  information on roads, streets and recreational facilities; and
  • supporting documents, such as maps, plans and  letters from suppliers of water and sewer facilities.

The company filing this information must swear and  affirm that it is correct and complete, and an appropriate fee must  accompany submission. The information is retained by HUD and is available for  public inspection. The property report, which is also prepared by the developer,  goes to the buyer. The law requires the seller to give the report to a  prospective lot purchaser prior to the time a purchase agreement is signed. Ask  for it. The seller is also required to have the buyer sign a receipt  acknowledging receipt of the property report. Do not sign the receipt  unless you have actually received the property report. Check the developer’s  property report before buying. This is the kind of information you will find in  a property report:

  • distances to nearby communities over  paved and unpaved roads;
  • existence of mortgages or liens on the  property;
  • whether contract payments are  placed in escrow; 
  • availability and location of  recreational facilities; 
  • availability of sewer and water  service or septic tanks and wells; 
  • present and proposed utility  services and charges; 
  • the number of homes currently  occupied; 
  • soil and foundation conditions  which could cause problems in construction or in using septic tanks;  and
  • the type of title the buyer may  receive and when it should be received.

Read the Property Report Before Signing  Anything

  This report  is prepared and issued by the developer of this subdivision. It is not prepared  or issued by the federal government. Federal law requires that you receive this  report prior to signing a contract or agreement to buy or lease a lot in this  subdivision. However, no federal agency has judged the merits or value of the  property. If you received the report prior to signing a contract or agreement,  you may cancel your contract or agreement by giving notice to the seller any  time before midnight of the seventh day following the signing of the contract or  agreement. If you did not receive this report before you signed a contract or  agreement, you may cancel the contract or agreement any time within two years  from the date of signing.
Your Contract  Rights
  If the lot  you are buying is subject to the jurisdiction of the Interstate Land Sales Full  Disclosure Act, the contract or purchase agreement must inform you of certain  rights given to buyers by that Act. The contract should state that the buyer has  a “cooling-off” period of seven days (or longer, if provided by state  law) following the day that the contract is signed to cancel the contract, for  any reason, by notice to the seller, and get his or her money back. Furthermore,  unless the contract states that the seller will give the buyer a warranty deed,  within 180 days after the contract is signed, the buyer has a right to cancel  the contract for up to two years from the day that the contract is signed,  unless the contract contains the following provisions: 
  • a clear description of the lot so  that the buyer may record the contract with the proper county authority;
  • the right of the buyer to a notice  of any default (by the buyer), and at least 20 days after receipt of that notice  to cure or remedy the default; 
  • a limitation on the amount of  money the seller may keep as liquidated damages, of 15% of the principal paid by  the buyer (exclusive of interest) or the seller’s actual damages, whichever is  greater.

Contract  Rights Concerning Property Reports

It has always been the law that if  the developer has an obligation to register with the Interstate Land Sales  Division, the developer or sales agent must give the buyer a copy of the current  property report before the buyer signs a contract. Otherwise, the buyer has up  to two years to cancel the contract and get their money back. That fact  must also be clearly set forth in all contracts. You may have the right to void  the contract if the subdivision has not been registered with HUD, or you were  not given a property report. Furthermore, if the developer has represented that  it will provide or complete roads, water, sewer, gas, electricity or  recreational facilities in its property report, in its advertising, or in its  sales promotions, the developer must obligate itself to do so in the contract,  clearly and conditionally (except for acts of nature or impossibility of  performance). In addition to the right to a full disclosure of information about  the lot, the prospective buyer may have the right to void the contract and  receive a refund of their money if the developer has failed to register the  subdivision with HUD or has failed to supply the purchaser with a property  report. While a purchaser may have the right to void the contract with the  developer under these conditions, the purchaser may still be liable for contract  payments to a third party if that contract has been assigned to a financing  institution or some similar entity. The registration is retained by HUD and is  available for public inspection. If the property report contains misstatements  of fact, if there are omissions, if fraudulent sales practices are used, or if  other provisions of the law have been violated, the purchaser may also sue to  recover damages and actual costs and expenses in court against the developer.  However, depending on when your sale occurred, you may be barred from taking  further action due to the Act’s statute of limitations. Your attorney can advise  you further on this matter.
 
“Cooling-Off”  Period
  Even if you  received the property report prior to the time of your signing of the contract  or agreement, you have the right to revoke the contract or agreement by notice  to the seller until midnight of the seventh day following the signing of the  contract. You should contact the developer, preferably in writing, if you wish  to revoke your contract and receive a refund of any money paid to date. Even if  the property report is delivered to you before you sign a sales agreement, the  law gives you a “cooling-off ” period. This right cannot be waived. 
 
 A Word About the Interstate Land Sales Division
The HUD unit which administers the  law, examines the developer’s registration statement, and registers the land  sales operator is the Interstate Land Sales Division. Except for disclosure  purposes, this office is not concerned with zoning or land-use planning, and has  no control over the quality of the subdivision. It does not dictate what land  can be sold, to whom, or at what price. It cannot act as a purchaser’s attorney.  But it will help purchasers secure the rights given to them by the Interstate  Land Sales Full Disclosure Act. HUD is authorized by law to conduct  investigations and public hearings, to subpoena witnesses and secure evidence,  and to seek court injunctions to prevent violations of the law. If necessary,  HUD may seek criminal indictments. HUD is authorized by law to conduct  investigations and, if necessary, seek criminal indictments. 
 
Exemptions from the  Law 
The prospective buyer should be  aware that not all promotional land sales operations are covered by the law. If  the land sales program is exempt, no registration is required by HUD, and there  will be no property report. Here are some of the specific situations for which  the statute allows exemptions without review by HUD, including the sale of: 

  • tracts of fewer than 100 lots which are  not otherwise exempt;
  • lots in a subdivision where every lot is 20 acres or more in  size;
  • lots upon which a residential, commercial or industrial  building has been erected, or where a sales contract obligates the seller to  build one within two years; 
  • certain lots which are sold only to residents of the state or  metropolitan area in which the subdivision is located; 
  • certain low-volume sales operations (no more than 12 lots a  year); 
  • certain lots that meet certain local codes and standards and  are zoned for single-family residences or are limited to single-family  residences by enforceable codes and restrictions; and
  • certain lots, contained in multiple sites of fewer than 100  lots each, offered pursuant to a common promotional plan.

Other exemptions are available which are not listed  above. If you have reason to believe that your sale is not exempt and may still  be covered by the law, contact the Interstate Land Sales Division. 

 
Know the  Developer
  Knowing your  rights under the law is the first step in making a sensible land purchase. To  exercise those rights, you also must know something about the honesty and  reliability of the developer who offers the subdivision that interests you.  Don’t fail to ask questions. Whether you are contacted by a sales agent on the  phone or by mail, at a promotional luncheon or dinner, in a sales booth at a  shopping center, or in the course of your own inspection of the subdivision,  make it your business to find out all you can about the company and the  property. In addition, get any verbal promises or representations in  writing. Don’t fail to ask questions. If you are seriously interested in buying  a lot, ask if the company is registered with HUD or is entitled to an exemption.  Request a copy of the property report and take the time to study it carefully  and thoroughly. If you still have unanswered questions, delay any commitment  until you have investigated. Discuss current prices in the area with local  independent brokers. Talk to other people who have purchased lots. A local  Chamber of Commerce, Better Business Bureau, or consumer protection group may  have information about the seller’s reputation. Inquire through county or  municipal authorities about local ordinances or regulations affecting properties  similar to that which you plan to buy. Don’t be high-pressured by sales agents. 
 
Know the Facts About the  Lot
  Once you  have decided on an appealing subdivision, inspect the property. Don’t buy “sight  unseen.” Better yet, hire an InterNACHI inspector to perform a thorough property  inspection. Also, check the developer’s plans for the project and know what you  are getting with your lot purchase. It’s a good idea to make a list of the facts  you will need to know. Some of the questions you should be asking, and  answering, are these:  
  • How large will the development become? 
  • What zoning controls are  specified?
  • What amenities are promised?
  • What provision has the developer made to  assure construction and maintenance?
  • What are the provisions for sewer and water service? 
  • Are all of the promised facilities and utilities in the  contract? 
  • Will there be access roads or streets to your property, and  how will they be surfaced? Who maintains them? How much will they  cost? 
  • Will you have clear title to the property? What liens,  reservations or encumbrances exist? 
  • Will you receive a deed upon purchase or a recordable sales  contract? 
  • What happens to your payments? Are they placed in a special  escrow account to pay for the property, or are they spent at once by the  developer? 
  • If the developer defaults on the mortgage or goes bankrupt,  could you lose your lot and investment to date to satisfy a claim against the  development? 
  • What happens when the developer moves out? Is there a  homeowners’ association to take over community management? 
  • Are there restrictions against using the lot for a campsite  until you are ready to build? 
  • Are there any annual maintenance fees or special assessments  required of property owners?

This  is a partial list of points to consider before you commit your money or your  signature.  

Know What You are  Doing
Interstate land sales promotions  often are conducted in a high-pressure atmosphere that sweeps unsophisticated  buyers along. Before they are aware that they have made a commitment, these  buyers may have signed a sales contract and started to make payments on a lot.  They may be delighted with the selection made, but, if not, it may be too late  for a change of mind.
 
Nine Dishonest Sales  Practices
  Here are  some of the practices avoided by reliable sales operations. Watch out for them  and exercise sales resistance if you suspect they are  occurring:
 
1. concealing or misrepresenting  facts about current and resale value. Sales agents may present general  facts about the area’s population growth, industrial or residential development,  and real estate price levels as if they apply to your specific lot. You may be  encouraged to believe that your piece of land represents an investment which  will increase in value as regional development occurs. A sales agent may tell  you that the developer will re-sell the lot, if you request. This promise may  not be kept. Future resale is difficult or impossible in many promotional  developments because much of your purchase price — sometimes as much as 40% –  has gone for an intensive advertising campaign and commissions for sales agents.  You are already paying a top price and it is unlikely that anyone else would pay  you more than you are paying the developer. You may even have to sell for less  than the price you originally paid for the lot. Sales promotions often are  conducted in a high-pressure atmosphere. Furthermore, when you attempt to sell  your lot, you are in competition with the developer, who probably holds  extensive, unsold acreage in the same subdivision. In most areas, real estate  brokers find it impractical to undertake the sale of lots in subdivisions and  will not accept such listings. It is unlikely that the lot you purchase through  interstate land sales represents an investment, in the view of professional land  investors. Remember, the elements of value of a piece of land are its  usefulness, the supply, the demand, and the buyer’s ability to re-sell it. The  Urban Land Institute estimates that land must double in value every five years  to justify holding it as an investment. In some areas, the cost of holding the  land, such as taxes and other assessments, can run as high as 11% a year. 
 
2. failure to honor refund  promises or agreements. Some sales promotions conducted by mail,  email or long-distance telephone include the offer of a refund if the  property has been misrepresented, or if the customer inspects the land within a  certain period of time and decides not to buy. When the customers request the  refund, s/he may encounter arguments about the terms of the agreement. The  company may even accuse its own agent of having made a money-back guarantee  without the consent or knowledge of the developer. Sometimes, the promised  refund is made, but only after a long delay.
 
3. misrepresentation of facts  about the subdivision. This is where the property report offers an  added measure of protection. A sales agent may offer false or incomplete  information relating to either a distant subdivision or one which you visit.  Misrepresentations often relate to matters such as the legal title, claims  against it, latent dangers (such as swamps or cliffs), unusual physical features  (such as poor drainage), restrictions on use, or lack of necessary facilities  and utilities. Read the property report carefully with an eye to omissions,  generalizations, or unproved statements that may tend to mislead you. If you are  concerned about overlooking something important, discuss the report and the  contract with a lawyer who understands real estate matters. The developer also  may use advertisements that imply that certain facilities and amenities are  currently available when they are not. Read the property report to determine  whether these facilities and amenities are actually completed, or proposed to be  completed in the future. If the company advertises sales on credit terms, the  Truth in Lending Act requires the sales contract to fully set forth all  terms of financing. This information must include total cost, simple annual  interest, and total finance charges.
 
4. failure to develop the  subdivision as planned. Many buyers rely upon the developer’s  contractual agreement or a verbal promise to develop the subdivision in a  certain way. The promised attractions that influenced your purchase (golf  course, marina, swimming pool, etc.) may never materialize after you become  an owner. If they are provided, it may be only after a long delay. If you are  planning on immediate vacation use of the property, or are working toward a  specific retirement date, you may find that the special features  promised of the development are not available when you need them. 
 
5. failure to deliver deeds  and/or title insurance policies. Documents relating to the sales  transaction may not be delivered as promised. Some sales in the promotional land  development industry are made by contract for a deed to be delivered when the  purchaser makes the last payment under the terms of the contract. A dishonest  developer may fail to deliver the deed, or deliver it only after a long delay. A  sales agent may offer false or incomplete information.
 
6. abusive treatment and  high-pressure sales tactics. Some sales agents drive prospective  customers around a subdivision in automobiles equipped with citizen band radios  which provide a running commentary on lot sales in progress. The customer may be  misled by this and other sales techniques to believe that desirable lots are  selling rapidly and that a hurried choice must be made. Hurrying the buyers into  a purchase they may later regret is only one ploy of high-pressure sales agents.  More offensive is abusive language used to embarrass customers who delay an  immediate decision to buy. In some instances, hesitant buyers have been isolated  in remote or unfamiliar places where transportation is controlled by the sales  agent or the agent’s organization.
 
7. failure to make good on sales  inducements. Free vacations, gifts, savings bonds, trading stamps, and  other promised inducements are used to lure people to sales presentations or to  development sites. These promised treats may never materialize. Sometimes,  special conditions are attached to the lure, or a customer is advised that gifts  go only to lot purchasers. A “free vacation” may be the means of delivering the  prospective buyer to a battery of high-pressure sales agents in a distant place.  The promised attractions may never materialize.
 
8. “bait and switch”  tactics. Lots are frequently advertised at extremely low prices. When  prospective buyers appear, they are told that the low-priced lots are all sold  and then are pressured to buy one that is much more expensive. If the cheaper  lot is available, it may be located on the side of a cliff or in another  inaccessible location. If accessible, it may be much too small for a building or  have other undesirable features. The buyers may be lured to the property with a  certificate entitling them to a “free” lot. Often, the certificate bears a face  value of $500 to $1,000. If the buyers attempt to cash it in, the amount is  simply included in the regular price (often inflated) of the lot they choose.  Often, this so-called “bait and switch” technique has a delayed fuse. Buyers who  purchase an unseen lot for later retirement may be unpleasantly surprised when  they visit the development. The lot they have paid for may be remote from other  homes, shopping and medical facilities. It may be insufficiently developed for  use. When the buyers complain, sales personnel attempt to switch them to a more  expensive lot, applying the money paid for the original lot to an inflated price  for the new one, and tacking on additional financing charges. If the unhappy  purchasers lack sufficient funds to accept this alternative, they are left with  an unusable, unmarketable first choice. 
 
9.  failure to grant rights under the Interstate Land Sales Full Disclosure  Act. Purchasers may not be given copies of the property report before  they sign a sales contract. Some sales agents withhold this detailed statement  until customers choose a specific lot. Sometimes, the buyers receive the report  in a mass of promotional materials and legal documents. Unaware that the report  is in their possession, they fail to read and understand it before signing a  sales contract.
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Anti Scalding

 

Anti-scald valves, also known as tempering valves and mixing valves, mix cold  water in with outgoing hot water so that the hot water that leaves a fixture is  not hot enough to scald a person.

Facts and Figures

  • Scalds account for 20% of all burns.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   
  • More than 2,000 American children are scalded each year, mostly in the  bathroom and kitchen.
  • Scalding and other types of burns require costly and expensive hospital  stays, often involving skin grafts and plastic surgery.
  • Scalding may lead to additional injuries, such as falls and heart attacks,  especially among the elderly.
  • Water that is 160º F can cause scalding in 0.5 seconds.

Unwanted temperature fluctuations are an annoyance and a safety hazard. When  a toilet is flushed, for instance, cold water flows into the toilet’s tank and  lowers the pressure in the cold-water pipes. If someone is taking a shower, they  will suddenly feel the water become hotter as less cold water is available to  the shower valve. By the same principle, the shower water will become  colder when someone in the house uses the hot-water faucet. This condition  is exacerbated by plumbing that’s clogged, narrow, or installed in showers  equipped with low-flow or multiple showerheads. A sudden burst of hot water can  cause serious burns, particularly in young children, who have thinner skin than  adults. Also, a startling thermal shock – hot or cold – may cause a person  to fall in the shower as he or she scrambles  on the slippery surface to adjust the water temperature. The  elderly and physically challenged are at particular risk.

Anti-scald valves mitigate this danger by maintaining water temperature at a  safe level, even as pressures fluctuate in water supply lines.  They look similar to ordinary shower and tub valves and are  equipped with a special diaphragm or piston mechanism that immediately  balances the pressure of the hot- and cold-water inputs, limiting one or the  other to keep the temperature within a range of several degrees. As a side  effect, the use of an anti-scald valve increases the amount of available hot  water, as it is drawn more slowly from the water heater. Inspectors and  homeowners may want to check with the authority having jurisdiction  (AHJ) to see if these safety measures are required in new construction in  their area.

Installation of anti-scald valves is typically simple and inexpensive. Most  models are installed in the hot-water line and require a cold-water feed. They  also require a swing check valve on the cold-water feed line to prevent hot  water from entering the cold-water system. They may be installed at the water  heater to safeguard the plumbing for the whole building, or only at specific  fixtures.

The actual temperature of the water that comes out of the fixture may be  somewhat different than the target temperature set on the anti-scald  valve. Such irregularities may be due to long, uninsulated plumbing  lines or defects in the valve itself. Users may fine-tune the valve with a  rotating mechanism that will allow the water to become hotter or colder,  depending on which way it’s turned. Homeowners may contact an InterNACHI  inspector or a qualified plumber if they have further questions or concerns.

In summary, anti-scald valves are used to reduce water temperature  fluctuations that may otherwise inconvenience or harm unsuspecting building  occupants.

 

Accurate Home Inspection Service Area Athens Ohio 45701 Local Information & Area Attractions

Athens Ohio 45701

Located just over 70 miles outside of Columbus, Ohio, the city of Athens may not  have that big-city appeal with several colleges from which  to choose, but it does boast a quintessential college-town atmosphere with Ohio  University, a major educational institution. Established in 1804, Ohio University is the oldest public institution of higher  learning in the  state of Ohio. The university mentions that the Athens campus has 17,000-plus  undergraduate students and more than 970 full-time faculty for a 19:1 student to  faculty ratio. It is a residential campus with all first- and second-year  students living in one of the university’s 42 residence halls, and many  third-year and above students also residing on or near campus. More than 1,400  students from other countries attend, creating an environment of diversity. Also  of note is the wealth of extracurricular and sports opportunities with more than  350 registered student organizations, 29 fraternities and sororities, and 16  NCAA Division I teams in the Mid-American Conference. The undergraduate division of Ohio University offers more than 250 majors in  nine colleges, including the College of Arts and  Sciences, the College of Business, the College of Fine Arts, the College of  Health Sciences and Professions, the Russ College of Engineering and Technology,  the Patton College of Education and Human Services, and the Scripps College of  Communication. Rounding out this list is the University College and the Honors  Tutorial College. The former serves as the college of entry for many first-year  and transfer students and has Ohio University’s only individualized degree, the  Bachelor of Specialized Studies. The latter offers a distinct program based on  the Oxbridge systems of tutorial education developed in England where students  receive a substantial portion of their education via one-on-one classes or small  seminars. According to Ohio University, the Honors Tutorial College is highly  selective with competitive admissions, only accommodating about 60 new students  each year. The university also offers graduate study programs, including  master’s degrees in many major academic divisions and doctoral degrees in  selected departments.

 

Athens is located in what was once the eastern region of the two major Native American mound-building groups, the Adena culture from c. 1000 B.C. to A.D. 200 and the Ohio Hopewell tradition, c. 300 B.C. to A.D. 700.[By the middle of the eighteenth century, the Shawnee, an Algonquian tribe, were the primary tribe of Native Americans living in what would become Athens County. No settlement is shown in the Athens area during the time immediately prior to the founding of Athens, according to a 1794 map by Thomas Kitchen. The first permanent European settlers arrived in Athens in 1797. In 1800, the town site was first surveyed and plotted, but it was not incorporated as a village until 1811. In the meantime, Ohio had become a state in 1803 and Ohio University was chartered in 1804, the first public institution of higher learning in the Northwest Territory. Previously part of Washington County, Ohio, Athens County was formed in 1805, named for the ancient center of learning, Athens, Greece. The establishment of Ohio University in Athens would mark the first federal endowment of an educational institution in the United States. In July 1787, the Congress of the Confederation gave to the Ohio Company of Associates “two townships of good land for the support of a literary institution” in the newly created Northwest Territory.[ During The First Session of the Second Territorial General Assembly, held in Chillicothe from November 23, 1801 to January 23, 1802, the General Assembly passed an act establishing the “American Western University” at Athens. The act was approved by Arthur St. Clair, Governor of the Northwest Territory on January 9, 1802.However, no university with the name of American Western University would be established. Ohio became a state in 1803 and on February 18, 1804, the state legislature passes an act establishing the “Ohio University” in the town of Athens.Athens received city status in 1912 following the 1910 census showing the population had passed 5,000 residents, the requirement for city status in Ohio.

 

 

Originally, large tracts of land in Athens and Alexander Townships were set aside through a contract between the Congress (under the Articles of Confederation) and the Ohio Company of Associates, a group of American Revolutionary War veterans. These lands were given to Ohio University by the Federal government. This was the first federal land grant for a university, pre-dating the Morrill Act by more than 70 years. At first, lands were mostly leased out, but the failure of many lessors to pay their rents resulted in most of the land being sold. The sale of these lands funded the growth of Ohio University. Today it is one of the largest institutions of higher learning in Ohio, with an enrollment of over 19,000 on the Athens campus and over 28,000 for all campuses. The earliest industry in the area was salt production, followed by iron production and coal extraction. Today, the largest employer in the county is Ohio University. In 1843, the Hocking Canal opened, enabling shipping from the Ohio River up the Hocking River, which passes through Athens, to Nelsonville, Ohio, and points beyond. However, the canal was closed during cold winters when it froze over. The first railroad reached Athens in 1857. In the late 19th century, an interurban line opened between Athens and Nelsonville and operated for some years. The Athens Lunatic Asylum, later called the Athens State Hospital, opened in 1874. This was located on high ground to the south of town and to the south of the Hocking River, and in the late 19th century was the town’s largest employer. The state hospital was eventually decommissioned and the property was deeded to Ohio University. It is now known as The Ridges. Much of the building space has been renovated for offices and research space, and most of the grounds have been set aside as open space, including a land lab. In 1904 the U.S. Army and the Ohio National Guard conducted joint training exercises near the city. Multiple US army regulars became drunk and were arrested by National Guard Provosts for causing disturbances. The arrests angered the regulars; on Friday a large contingent set out from camp to free an arrested comrade. The armed regulars were stopped by provosts and the ensuing quarrel quickly escalated into a shoot-out on Washington Street, during which one guardsman was killed and five others were wounded.

 

Local Attractions:

http://www.athensohio.com/

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Unvented roof assemblies

Unvented roof assemblies are becoming an increasingly common  construction alternative to traditional vented roofs. They are designed without  ventilation openings, and the attic is conditioned like the rest of the living  space.

Unvented roofs operate by the principle that venting is not necessary to  control moisture accumulation. The following conditions must be met in order for  an unvented roofing assembly to function properly:

    • The building envelope must be tight, including having adequate vapor and air  barriers installed, which is generally accomplished through the use of  spray-foam insulation.
    • The building must be pressurized in order to counter the stack effect, which  happens when hot, pressurized air in the upper part of the house tries to escape  through holes in the building envelope.

Proponents argue that, when installed and implemented properly, unvented  roofing assemblies offer the following advantages over vented attics:

  • enhanced comfort. Wind, temperature gradients and pressure differences in a  vented attic create undesirable air movement between the living space and the  attic. Also, unvented attics block volatile organic compounds and other  moisture-related airborne particles from migrating to the living space from the  attic;
  • protection against certain moisture-related problems. In vented attics in  cold climates, warm air can leak from the living space and condense on the  underside of the roof sheathing, while humid air can easily leak from the  outdoors and condense on cold metal surfaces of ductwork and air-conditioning  equipment typically located in the attic. Unvented attics do not experience such  problems;
  • energy conservation. An unvented attic is conditioned space and won’t be  subject to the extremes of temperature common to vented attics. Heat is thus  less likely to escape into an unvented attic from HVAC equipment, and if it  does, it will remain within the conditioned space. Insulation around ducts and  HVAC equipment becomes less critical, and the equipment is not forced to work as  hard to compensate for unwanted air or heat loss. It might be possible to  downsize the HVAC system if enough energy is saved in this manner. Also, cold  air blowing through the eave vents in a vented attic can degrade the thermal  performance of attic insulation;
  • snow and ember barrier. Openings in the soffits, gables, mushroom and ridge  vents easily allow snow intrusion, especially fine snowflakes, into the attic.  The snow can accumulate and eventually melt, causing damage to building  materials and encouraging the growth of mold. Airborne mold spores may pass  through vented attics into the living space and harm susceptible individuals.  Also, blowing embers from wildfires can pass through unscreened attic vents and  light the house on fire. These blowing embers often fall far from the edge of  the actual wildfire, which might not otherwise have reached the  house; and
  • expanded use and design options. Because the temperature in unvented  attics is more easily controlled, they can be furnished and incorporated into  the living space or used as a conditioned storage space. Also, unvented roof  assembles make complicated roof geometries more viable, as they are difficult to  ventilate effectively.

While unvented attics are gaining acceptance, homeowners must realize their  limitations, including:

  • codes. Many local building codes do not account for non-standard  construction alternatives such as unvented attic assemblies. They were addressed  in the 2006 International Residential Code (IRC), however, which states that  they must have no vapor retarder installed between the attic and the home’s  living space, and there must be air-impermeable insulation  installed between the rafters;
  • asphalt shingles may fail prematurely due to increased exposure to heat;  and
  • ice dams are more likely to form at unvented attics in cold  climates.
Inspectors and homeowners should understand that unvented roof  assemblies are a controversial idea. The Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers  Association (ARMA), for instance, has argued that the IRC’s acceptance in 2006  of this design should be repealed.  ARMA representative Dave  Roodvoets has stated,  “Even the best researchers have only a few  years of data on unvented attics in humid climates.”  ARMA  also contends that unvented roofs may make a building more susceptible to  decay by trapping moisture inside. Proponents of the design have countered  this contention by pointing out that in humid climates, most  moisture comes from the exterior.
In summary, unvented roofs offer certain advantages if they are  designed properly.
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Pre-Listing Home Inspection service

Benefits of a Pre-Listing Home Inspection

 Pre-listing home inspections give both the buyer and seller up-front knowledge of potential repair costs.
Inventories in most parts of the country have been pushing historically high levels. Gone are the days of multiple offers, and buyers camping out and entering lotteries to make a home purchase. With the shifting market, buyers are increasingly more sensitive to property condition and are more than ever asking for full disclosure up front about condition and other factors that affect the value.
A pre-inspected listing makes available to the buyers a full inspection report by a qualified home inspector. The report educates the buyers on the condition of the property under consideration, and lets them know what major potential expenses might be incurred once they close on the house. Then the buyer can decide early on if they want to pursue a property, given the condition.  There may be some excepted items they can live with, but others they cannot.
The same report can and should be used by the sellers to assist them in preparing property disclosure documents. It allows the seller to anticipate any objections directed toward property structure and system functions such as heating and air conditioning – objections that may have potential financial implications.
A pre-listing inspection can be available at the property for review by the buyers after viewing the property. The listing agent should also have the inspection report available for prospective buyers and their agents through an HTML link on their website.
While a pre-listing inspection will not head off every potential “deal-breaker” issue, most agree the benefits outweigh holding off on the inspection until after contract acceptance.  Here are some of benefits to conducting the inspection prior to the listing.

  • Identify defects and make repairs ahead of time.  By identifying possible defects early on, the seller is in a position to handle repairs prior to listing, making the listing more attractive and the property more saleable. This may mean more money to the seller and a faster sale. Making repairs ahead of time will limit objections over defects during the negotiations. If the seller elects not to repair certain defects that turn up in the inspection, they can disclose the defects to potential buyers in the disclosure documents. State disclosure laws vary, and sellers should consult with their attorneys on state disclosure laws.
  • Aid as a pricing tool. Having a completed inspection report from a certified inspector will help you (the seller) arrive at a realistic list price. If you find out, for example, that your HVAC system shows significant wear and tear and will need to be replaced before the next winter season, you should take that into consideration when pricing your home for sale.
  • Provide a feeling of confidence to potential buyers. With a clean inspection in hand after viewing a property, potential buyers may feel more comfortable in moving ahead with an offer. When a buyer can see there are no major defects in the property to be addressed, it is easier for them to determine how much they can comfortably spend on the house. If there is a problem that needs to be addressed, they buyers can write an offer that will reflect the cost of the needed repairs, or they can ask the sellers to remedy the defect.

Best practices in today’s buyers’ markets dictate one of the best things sellers can do to facilitate a sale is to conduct a pre-listing property inspection by a certified inspector, and have it readily available for potential buyers. The more information buyers have will aid in the negotiations and hopefully result in a successful contract.

 

Accurate Home Inspections Parkersburg West Virginia 26101

 

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What is an inspection contingency?

An inspection contingency gives the buyer the right to get the home professionally inspected and allows the buyer to negotiate further if there are repair issues found with the home. Be sure your Agent is including this in your purchase offer or you could lose a lot of money. Without a inspection contingency you are buying the house and everything wrong with it. Everything is negotiable and an experienced real estate agent will help you negotiate if issues are found. Your making a large investment in your future, probably the biggest most of us ever make. Make sure that it is a profitable one. The average home inspection will cost you between $300-$400 depending on the size of the home. If multiple issues are found the inspection could pay for itself or save you thousands of dollars in repairs if an unknown major defect is found. Buying a home without having it inspected by a licensed professional home inspector is a risk not worth taking.

An inspection contingency is an addendum,

An Addendum is any addition to, or modification of, a contract. Also called an amendment or rider to a contract. This gives buyers the right to have a professional home inspector or other third party examine the property within a certain period of time (Usually 14 days) after the agreement is accepted to purchase has been signed. Declining this option could cost you a lot of money and is a very high risky to take.. Taking a few extra steps with due diligence could prevent a purchase nightmare.

 

One very important point to consider when buying a home is the cost of any repairs that might be needed on the home before you move in.

 

The most important point a of an inspection contingency is to protect you from purchasing a home that may have serious structural problems or material defects that aren’t plainly visible to most people.  A certified home inspector is trained in every aspects of a home from the roof down to the foundation, and all typical mechanical systems found within. If you have a home inspection contingency in your contract and your home inspector finds something terribly wrong with the home, you can walk away from the deal completely or negotiate the selling price to compensate for the repairs.

The Inspection

A proper home inspection can take up to 3 to 4 hours to complete, depending on the size of the property and the complexity of any issues that are uncovered. In addition to a regular home inspection, you might choose to add other inspections to the inspection contingency, including:

Radon. An odorless substance that rises from the ground, radon has been shown to have negative effects on the development and growth of children. You can get rid of radon by opening a basement window or introducing a ventilation system that allows fresh air to circulate, but you need to know if it is there.

Asbestos. Asbestos is a hazardous material that was frequently used as a fire retardant and as pipe insulation. But asbestos can cause lung cancer and it is expensive and difficult to remove.

Lead. Sellers are required to disclose to buyers if they have lead paint in their house. There are inexpensive swipe tests that you can do to see if there is lead in the paint or water. Or, you can hire a lead inspector to provide a full report.

Toxic Substances. If the property is located near a gas station, dry cleaners, dump or other waste disposal facility, you may wish to have a specialist take soil samples to determine if your property is contaminated by any toxic substances. You can also send a sample of the water to a laboratory.

Structural engineer. If the property has a crack in the foundation wider than 1/8″, or if the doorways are misaligned, you may wish to hire a structural engineer to determine if the property has severe, moderate, or normal structural issues. This type of inspection is increasingly common in places like earthquake-prone Southern California, although you may wish to hire one if you are uneasy about the structural integrity of the home.

Pests. Worried about uninvited guests? You can hire an inspector who specializes in pests, including termites, mice, rats, roaches, carpenter ants, chipmunks, and other things you’d rather not have in your living space.

Your contingency must be in writing, and it must allow you to cancel your deal and get your good faith deposit back, if the property fails to pass inspection.

Just remember that your inspection contingency does not give  you a free pass to cancel the deal for any reason. All houses (even newly-built ones) will have some minor issues that can be repaired easily. Canceling the deal without allowing the seller to attempt to fix a problem (or reduce the purchase price as compensation for repair) isn’t a very nice thing to do.

Accurate Home Inspections Parkersburg West Virginia 26101

 

Accurate Home Inspections Service Area: Charleston West Virginia Local Information

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Charleston is a family-friendly city full of great things to see and do for people of all ages, Charleston is the capital and largest city of the U.S. state of West Virginia. It is located at the confluence of the Elk and Kanawha Rivers in Kanawha County. As of the 2010 Census, it had a population of 51,400, while its metropolitan area had 304,214. It is the county seat of Kanawha County.

Early industries important to Charleston included salt and the first natural gas well. Later, coal became central to economic prosperity in the city and the surrounding area. Today, trade, utilities, government, medicine and education play the central role in the city’s economy.

The first permanent settlement, Ft. Lee, was built in 1788. In 1791, Daniel Boone was a member of the Kanawha County Assembly.

Charleston is the home of the West Virginia Power (formerly the Charleston Alley Cats and the Charleston Wheelers) minor league baseball team, the West Virginia Wild minor league basketball team, and the annual 15-mile (24 km) Charleston Distance Run. Yeager Airport and the University of Charleston are also located in the city.

Charleston is also home to the 130th Airlift Wing of the West Virginia Air National Guard.

The city also contains public parks, such as Cato Park and Coonskin Park, and the Kanawha State Forest, a large public state park that sustains a pool, camping sites, several biking/walking trails, picnic areas, as well as several shelters provided for recreational use.

History:

After the American Revolutionary War, pioneers began making their way out from the early settlements. Many slowly migrated into the western part of Virginia. Capitalizing on its many resources made Charleston an important part of Virginia and West Virginia history. Today, Charleston is the largest city in the state and the state capital.

Charleston’s history goes back to the 18th century. Thomas Bullitt was deeded 1,250 acres (5 km2) of land near the mouth of the Elk River in 1773. It was inherited by his brother, Cuthbert Bullitt, upon his death in 1782, and sold to Col. George Clendenin in 1786. The first permanent settlement, Fort Lee, was built in 1787 by Col. Clendenin and his company of Virginia Rangers. This structure occupied the area that is now the intersection of Brooks Street and Kanawha Boulevard. Historical conjecture indicates that Charleston is named after Col. Clendenin’s father, Charles. Charles Town was later shortened to Charleston to avoid confusion with another Charles Town in eastern West Virginia, which was named after George Washington’s brother Charles.

Six years later, the Virginia General Assembly officially established Charleston. On the 40 acres (160,000 m2) that made up the town in 1794, 35 people inhabited seven houses.

Charleston is part of Kanawha County. The origin of the word Kanawha (pronounced “KA-NAW”), “Ka(h)nawha”, derives from the region’s Iroquois dialects meaning “water way” or “Canoe Way” implying the metaphor, “transport way”, in the local language. It was and is the name of the river that flows past Charleston. The grammar of the “hard H” sound soon dropped out as new arrivals of various European languages developed West Virginia. The phrase has been a matter of Register (sociolinguistics). In fact, a two-story jail was the first county structure ever built, with the first floor literally dug into the bank of the Kanawha River.

Daniel Boone, who was commissioned a lieutenant colonel of the Kanawha County militia, was elected to serve in 1791 in the Virginia House of Delegates. As told in historical accounts, Boone walked all the way to Richmond.

Source: Wikipedia

Charleston West Virginia Local Attractions:

Clay Center’s Avampato Discovery Museum

Appalachian Power Park

Kanawha State Forest

Daniel Boone Park

 

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Accurate Home Inspections Parkersburg West Virginia 26101

Accurate Home Inspection Service Area Belpre Ohio 45714 Local Information & Area Attractions

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Accurate Home Inspections (304)916-6659 Serving Belpre Ohio 45714

 

Belpre Ohio 45714 is a city in Washington County, Ohio, United States, along the Ohio River. The town was originally named Belle Prairie or “Beautiful Prairie.”

Belpre is Part of the Parkersburg-Marietta-Vienna, WV-OH Metropolitan Statistical area that is also known as The Mid Ohio Valley, it is located about 14 miles downriver from Marietta. In 1870 the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad completed the Parkersburg Bridge (CSX) across the river; at 7,140 feet (2,180 m), it was reportedly the longest in the world.

The population was 6,441 at the 2010 census. Belpre was the second United States settlement in the Northwest Territory after Marietta. The city is home to the first library established in the Territory. Its public school hired the first female schoolteacher in Ohio.

In 1845 railroad developers in 1845 founded the Belpre and Cincinnati Railroad, but the destination was changed to Marietta, with a corresponding name change in 1851. For a considerable time, travelers had to go by steamboat to connect between Marietta to Parkersburg, Virginia, which received service from the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in 1857. This was shortly before the western part of the state seceded to form West Virginia in 1861. Belpre and Marietta were later connected by rail. Coal service is still active on this line.

From 1868-1870, the B&O built the Parkersburg Bridge (CSX) between West Virginia and Belpre, on its main line to St. Louis, Missouri. Designed by Jacob Linville, when completed in 1870, the bridge was reportedly the longest in the world at 7,140 feet (2,180 m).This brought more trade to the town, provided for shipping Ohio coal to the East Coast, and improved access on both sides of the river.

Developing in a different pattern from the more industrial cities of eastern Ohio, Belpre reached its peak of population in 1970. It has had some loss since then, but is relatively stable compared to the former industrial cities, which have lost half their residents since peaks in 1940 and 1950.

The Steven Soderbergh film Bubble (2006), was filmed in Belpre and Parkersburg, West Virginia, using an all-local cast.

Local Attractions in Belpre Ohio 45714:

Anderson Hancock Planetarium

Sweet Apple Farm

The Wilds

Accurate Home Inspections Parkersburg West Virginia 26101

There are no schools near by this property.

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Accurate Home Inspections Service Area Parkersburg West Virginia 26101 Local Information

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                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          If you are new to the area or planning on relocating to the Mid Ohio Valley, Check out some of our local facts and information including School’s and area attractions. We offer home inspection service in our home town of Parkersburg West Virginia

Accurate Home Inspections (304)916-6659 Parkersburg West Virginia 26101

 

located at the confluence of the Ohio and Little Kanawha Rivers, Parkersburg is the third largest city in the State of West Virginia. It is the county seat of Wood County and the largest city in the Parkersburg-Marietta-Vienna Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is about 14 miles south of Marietta, Ohio.

Parkersburg was connected to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in 1857, but lacked a crossing over the Ohio River until after the American Civil War. When constructed 1868-1870, the Parkersburg Bridge (CSX) by the B&O to Belpre was the longest railroad bridge in the world.

The Bureau of the Public Debt, an agency of the U.S. Treasury Department, was relocated from the Washington, DC metropolitan area and is headquartered in Parkersburg

Parkersburg was originally named Newport when it was laid out in the late 18th century following the American Revolutionary War. A town section was laid out over land granted to Alexander Parker for his Revolutionary War service, as Virginia, which then controlled the territory, was using land grants in lieu of cash payments to veterans. The title conflicts between Parker and the city planners of Newport were settled in 1809 in favor of his heirs. The town was renamed Parkersburg in 1810. It was chartered by the Virginia General Assembly in 1820. It was re=chartered as a city in 1860.

The town was the terminus of the Staunton-Parkersburg Turnpike and the Northwestern Turnpike. In 1857 the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad built a branch line south to the town from Wheeling. Travelers wanting to connect with the Ohio Marietta and Cincinnati Railroad, one of the east-west lines along the Ohio River, had to take a steamboat 14 miles north to Marietta Ohio.

A planned railroad bridge was designed by Jacob Linville and finally constructed by the B&O in 1868-1870 between Parkersburg and Belpre, Ohio, as part of its main line from Baltimore to St. Louis, Missouri. This pulled away traffic and trade from Marietta. Today the structure is known as the Parkersburg Bridge (CSX).

The town was important as a transportation and medical center during the American Civil War. It became a transportation hub in the gas and oil boom following that war.

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There are no schools near by this property.

Links to Our local schools in Parkersburg West Virginia:

Parkersburg South High

Parkersburg High

Edison Jr High

Fairplains Elementary

 

 

Links to Our local area attraction’s in Parkersburg West Virginia:

Blennerhassett Island State Park

Grand Central Mall

North Bend Rail Trail State Park

North Bend State Park

Holl”s Swiss Chocolate

Juliann square

Mountwood Park

Oil And Gas Museum

Parkersburg Art Center

The Smoot Theatre

Valley Gem Sternwheeler

Mid Ohio Valley Veterans Museum

Parkersburg Home Coming

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Accurate Home Inspections Parkersburg West Virginia 26101